I have Bell’s Palsy, left side of face paralyzed for now…

I have Bells Palsy, left side of face paralyzed for now...

Hi All,

I wanted to let you all know why I have been putting out so many camtasia videos instead of videos of my face the last 2 weeks.

On January 12 when I woke up the left side of my face was numb. I was freaking out a little bit and didn’t know what was wrong. So I went to the doctor and they told me I have a rare case of Bell’s Palsy. All They gave me was some medication and told me it should be gone in 4-6 weeks. Its been about 2 weeks now and its still paralyzed but my taste buds are coming back to normal, so thats a good sign…

Anyway I Just thought I would keep everyone updated on my progress and Here is a list of FAQ’s in case you wanted to know what Bell’s Palsy is… Enjoy!

Mike Hobbs

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WHAT IS BELL’S PALSY?

Bells palsy is a condition that causes the facial muscles to weaken or become paralyzed. It’s caused by trauma to the 7th cranial nerve, and is not permanent.

WHY IS IT CALLED BELL’S PALSY?

The condition is named for Sir Charles Bell, a Scottish surgeon who studied the nerve and its innervation of the facial muscles 200 years ago.

HOW COMMON IS BELL’S PALSY?

Bells palsy is not as uncommon as is generally believed. Worldwide statistics set the frequency at approximately .02% of the population (with geographical variations). In human terms this is 1 of every 5000 people, and 40,000 Americans every year.

IS BELL’S PALSY ALWAYS ON THE SAME SIDE?

The percentage of left or right side cases is approximately equal, and remains equal for recurrences.

IS THERE ANY DIFFERENCE BECAUSE OF GENDER OR RACE?

The incidence of Bells palsy in males and females, as well as in the various races is also approximately equal. The chances of the condition being mild or severe, and the rate of recovery is also equal.

WHAT CONDITIONS CAN INCREASE THE CHANCE OF HAVING BELL’S PALSY?

Older people are more likely to be afflicted, but children are not immune to it. Children tend to recover well. Diabetics are more than 4 times more likely to develop Bells palsy than the general population. The last trimester of pregnancy is considered to be a time of increased risk for Bell’s palsy. Conditions that compromise the immune system such as HIV or sarcoidosis increase the odds of facial paralysis occurring and recurring.

CAN BELL’S PALSY AFFECT BOTH SIDES OF THE FACE?

It is possible to have bilateral Bells palsy, but it’s rare, accounting for less than 1% of cases. With bilateral facial palsy, it’s important to rule out all other possible diagnoses with thorough diagnostic tests.

CAN BELL’S PALSY AFFECT OTHER PARTS OF THE BODY?

Bells palsy should not cause any other part of the body to become paralyzed, weak or numb. If any other areas are affected Bell’s palsy is not the cause of the symptoms, and further testing must be done.

HOW DO THE SYMPTOMS OF BELL’S PALSY PROGRESS?

Very quickly. Most people either wake up to find they have Bells palsy, or have symptoms such as a dry eye or tingling around their lips that progress to classic Bell’s palsy during that same day. Occasionally symptoms may take a few days to be recognizable as Bells palsy. The degree of paralysis should peak within several days of onset – never in longer than 2 weeks (3 weeks maximum for Ramsey Hunt syndrome). A warning sign may be neck pain, or pain in or behind the ear prior to palsy, but it is not usually recognized in first-time cases.

IS BELL’S PALSY CONTAGIOUS?

No, it is not contagious. People with Bells palsy can return to work and resume normal activity as soon as they feel up to it.

WHAT ABOUT RECOVERY FROM BELL’S PALSY?

Approximately 50% of Bells palsy patients will have essentially complete recoveries in a short time. Another 35% will have good recoveries in less than a year.

Regardless of the trigger, Bell’s palsy is best described as an event – trauma to the nerve. As with any other injury, healing follows. The quality and duration of recovery is dependent on the severity of the initial injury. If the nerve has suffered nothing more than a mild trauma, recovery can be very fast, taking several days to several weeks. An “average” recovery is likely to take between a few weeks and a few months. The nerve regenerates at a rate of approximately 1-2 millimeters per day, and can continue to regenerate for 18 months, probably even longer. Improvement of appearance can continue beyond that time frame.

IS MUSCLE ATROPHY A CONCERN?

Not as a rule. It takes longer for the muscles to start to atrophy than it takes for most people to fully recover.

IS BELL’S PALSY LIKELY TO HAPPEN AGAIN?

The possibility of recurrence had been thought to be as high as 10 – 20%. These figures have been lowered as more has been learned about conditions that are now diagnosed as other types of facial palsies. Estimates of the rate of recurrence still vary widely, from around 4 – 14%. Most recent reports hover at 5 – 9%. The average timespan between recurrences is 10 years.

Tags: Bell's Palsy, mike hobbs, paralyzed

Leave A Reply (12 comments so far)


  1. plastic surgery
    4 years ago

    Useful blog website, keep me personally through searching it, I am seriously interested to find out another recommendation of it.

    [Reply]

  2. How are you now Mike? Hope you are now okay.

    Thanks for sharing this knowledge about Bell’s Palsy. Very Informative! This is great!

    [Reply]

  3. If you still have Bell's palsy and want to try something natural, check out the product Vedic Relief. If you send an e-mail too support@vedicrelief.com and tell them you're from Michael & Christy Hobbs' site, they'll send you a free bottle (no s&h, no credit card info, nothing) They need more testers with Bell's palsy and as long as you are honest and provide an actual review they'll send you a free bottle.

    [Reply]


  4. Mike & Christy
    5 years ago

    Michael I still have bells palsy, still not totally gone, but I can kinda move my face now. I’m starting to do videos again and not feel embarrassed.

    Pretty cool.

    Mike Hobbs

    [Reply]


  5. Michael Paul
    5 years ago

    I was just browsing your blog and found this post. It looks like this happened back in January. I’m so sorry to hear about your condition. I would say by now you have made a full recovery. My wife works with a guy that had this same thing. I think by now he is back to being 100% as well. It’s a rare condition but in most cases not too serious I think. Any way you will be fine your a internet marketing warrior… “What does not kill us makes us stronger”

    [Reply]


  6. Magnus Österlund
    6 years ago

    Hi there Mike.

    Sorry to hear about you getting BP. I had it aswell 3 years ago and it was rather severe. I had pains and my whole left face was totally gone for several weeks.

    Gradually it got better, but i still suffer from it today, especially when im tired or stressed, it gives me little twitches in my left eye. You´ll probably notice in a few weeks/months as your 7th facial nerve heal, that when you eat or drink, your eye will get tears and you´re gonna need a hankie to blow your nose. (good party trick!) This is unfortunally what most BP patients get.

    Something about the nerves getting connected in the wrong way when healing. Today i´m used to it, so i dont mind it that much. After all it could have been worse. Noone notices visually that i´ve had BP, something which i was afraid of when first diagnosed. So im happy.

    I see that today there is much more information about BP then it was 3years ago, What saved me that time (since the doctor did not inform me so much) was this website: http://www.bellspalsy.ws you´ve probably allready found it. The people there are great and most helpfull.

    Ohh one last thing that made my life sooo much easier at the time. Get an protective eyeglass ASAP! It enables you to watch tv or use the computer with out having to use so much eyedrops/gel.

    Other than that, there is nothing more todo then rest and eat food supliments/vitamins which im sure you allready do. I´m taking Lifepak everyday eversince i had BP. Dont wanna risk getting it again! My antioxidant score is 3 times higher today than what it was 3years ago. :-)

    Ohh yes! film yourself when you try to close your eye. Depending on how severe you are, you´ll see the eye white when it rolls up in the back, which all humans do everytime we blink, but it goes so fast it normally cant be seen, except when unable to close the eyelid… Looks quite “funny”.

    Anyways, take care Mike and dont worry, it will eventually get better. Just be patient.

    Kind regards
    Magnus

    [Reply]


  7. soapboxholland
    6 years ago

    Mike,
    I had Bell’s Palsey about 12 years ago – similar situation, woke up one day and my face was paralyzed. Didn’t hurt just made it difficult to eat, drink and blink my eye. It totally went away after about 5 weeks. Prayers and best of luck to you!
    Not sure what they have told you but they believe mine was stressed related.

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    Yes it was a surprise that’s for sure. It Still hasn’t gone away yet, but hopefully soon.

    Have a great day!

    Mike Hobbs

    [Reply]


  8. Forrest Bivens
    6 years ago

    Wow…Like the other comments have stated, I pray you’ll make a speedy recovery so you can (among more important things) get your mug back in front of the camera!

    Best wishes; please keep us informed of your progress.

    [Reply]


  9. Mary Carmack
    6 years ago

    Mike,
    Just to let you know my husband woke up 6 years ago with the left side of his face paralyzed and was told he had Bell’s Palsey. He was given some medication that didn’t do anything, so on day 4 he went to an acupuncture doctor, got 3 treatments and his face was back to normal. He hasn’t had a problem since. Something to consider!

    [Reply]


  10. Adam Holland
    6 years ago

    crap, mike – hope everything turns out well.

    i know someone that had it about 30 years ago and he made a complete recovery. i’ll pray for you brother!

    Adam Holland

    [Reply]


  11. dante
    6 years ago

    Sorry to hear that Mike. But it's not that sickness that you have to be too worried. I Hope you well.

    [Reply]


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